The Woman in Cabin 10

The woman in Cabin 10  is Ruth Ware‘s second novel. It, just like In a Dark Dark Wood, is a psychological thriller. I was not as impressed with this book as I was with In a Dark Dark Wood. In some ways it was more suspenseful, but there are certain parts of the story that I wish had connected to the ending (I won’t spoil anything here).

The main character, Lo Blacklock, is a journalist for a travel magazine. Honestly though, I don’t see how. She’s the most socially awkward person in the book. I seriously cringed at some of the things she said or some of the ways she acted. Lo’s boss must have really liked her, or else she wouldn’t have been in the business for ten years.

The majority of the story takes place on a luxury cruise with other journalist and business people, one of whom happens to be Lo’s ex boyfriend. During most of the book, you’re listening to Lo freak out (internally and externally) about almost everything. I’m pretty sure if someone dropped a pen near this woman, she’d lose her shit.

I won’t say much more, because I don’t want spoil the book. I honestly only finished it because it was an audio book and I had already paid for it. This book was decent, but it wasn’t a stand out to me.
Happy reading!

Moriah

In a Dark, Dark Wood

In a Dark, Dark Wood by Ruth Ware  is a psychological thriller based around a girl named Leonora Shaw. Leonora, Nora (Lee also), is a Crime writer who lives in London. She gets invited to her old high school friend’s Hen, which is apparently like a bachelorette party. She has not talked to Clare in ten years and cannot fathom why Clare would invite her the Hen but not to the wedding. Her and her other high school friend, Nina, agree to go together. The book starts off with Nora being woken up in the hospital. She has a head injury, everything hurts. She’s asking herself what she has done. She doesn’t remember how she got to the hospital and why. The rest of the book goes between her remembering the moments before the got hurt and her being in the hospital, wondering what exactly happened. And you, as the reader will be wondering (for a while) ‘who the hell is James?’.

As far as psychological thrillers go, this one wasn’t as shocking as Girl on the Train. I was not blindsided by the truth, but I still had questions and doubts until the end about who was the bad person. I found this book easy to read and easy to get sucked into. I didn’t want to put it down. I had to know how it ended. So, I’d definitely call it a success.

It’s hard to review psychological thrillers without giving anything away, but I will say, if you like the genre, you’ll like this book.

 

Happy reading!

 

Moriah